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What is Fructose.

June 29, 2012

By Joan McDaniel          July 29, 2012

What is Fructose.

Apple                                                                                                   HFCS

This is from an article by Dr. Mercola  on Fruit.  Fruit is good for you but, take another look for it may just be  too much of a good thing.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/06/08/7-healthy-foods-that-are-making-you-fat.aspx

What is One of  the Top  Weight Gain Culprits?

Fructose!

This sugar is often deemed a “healthy” type because it’s the kind that exists naturally in fruit. And if you were to only eat fructose in a piece of fruit or two a day, you’d probably be just fine.

The central issue is that fructose is now used in virtually all processed foods (whether you’d suspect the food would contain a sweetener or not). Case in point: the number one source of calories in the United States is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in the form of soda!

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)— comprises any of a group of corn syrups that has undergone enzymatic processing to convert some of its glucose into fructose to produce a desired sweetness. In the United States, consumer foods and products typically use high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener. It has become very common in processed foods and beverages in the U.S., including breads, cereals, breakfast bars, lunch meats, yogurts, soups, and condiments.

If you’re able to keep your total fructose consumption below 25 grams per day then it’s not typically going to cause you or your family any major health issues. Unfortunately, while this is theoretically possible, precious few people are actually doing that. Cutting out a few desserts will not make a big difference if you’re still eating a “standard American diet” — I’ve previously written about how various foods and beverages contain far more sugar than a glazed doughnut.

Because of the prevalence of HFCS in foods and beverages, the average person now consumes one-third of a pound of sugar EVERY DAY, which is five ounces or 150 grams, half of which is fructose. That’s 300 percent more than the amount that will trigger biochemical havoc.

Remember that is the AVERAGE; many actually consume more than twice that amount.

Evidence is mounting that excess sugar, and fructose in particular, is the primary factor in the obesity epidemic,and insulin resistant Diabetis,  so it’s definitely a food you want to avoid if you want to lose weight. Does this mean you need to avoid fruit too? As you can see in this table, some fruits are very high in fructose, so munching indiscriminately could set you back.

Don’t stop eating fruit just watch how much daily Fructose you are actually consuming.

Fruit Serving Size Grams of Fructose
Limes 1 medium 0
Lemons 1 medium 0.6
Cranberries 1 cup 0.7
Passion fruit 1 medium 0.9
Prune 1 medium 1.2
Apricot 1 medium 1.3
Guava 2 medium 2.2
Date (Deglet Noor style) 1 medium 2.6
Cantaloupe 1/8 of med. melon 2.8
Raspberries 1 cup 3.0
Clementine 1 medium 3.4
Kiwifruit 1 medium 3.4
Blackberries 1 cup 3.5
Star fruit 1 medium 3.6
Cherries, sweet 10 3.8
Strawberries 1 cup 3.8
Cherries, sour 1 cup 4.0
Pineapple 1 slice (3.5″ x .75″) 4.0
Grapefruit, pink or red 1/2 medium 4.3
Fruit Serving Size Grams of Fructose
Boysenberries 1 cup 4.6
Tangerine/mandarin orange 1 medium 4.8
Nectarine 1 medium 5.4
Peach 1 medium 5.9
Orange (navel) 1 medium 6.1
Papaya 1/2 medium 6.3
Honeydew 1/8 of med. melon 6.7
Banana 1 medium 7.1
Blueberries 1 cup 7.4
Date (Medjool) 1 medium 7.7
Apple (composite) 1 medium 9.5
Persimmon 1 medium 10.6
Watermelon 1/16 med. melon 11.3
Pear 1 medium 11.8
Raisins 1/4 cup 12.3
Grapes, seedless (green or red) 1 cup 12.4
Mango 1/2 medium 16.2
Apricots, dried 1 cup 16.4
Figs, dried 1 cup 23.0
2 Comments
  1. Awesome list. Really shows how hard it is to cut fructose out.

  2. Washout
    It is hard but as Dr. Mercola says keep it under 25 grams a day. That’s low but enough for some blueberrys, strawberrys, cranberrys, add that to some fat like walnuts and the system will not absorb it fructose so fast and not raise insulin. You need to slow your digestion down to avoid Insulin resistance.
    Have a great day

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