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Is there a Difference between Smoked Salmon and Frozen?

August 29, 2012

By Joan McDaniel                                                     August 28, 2012

Smoked Salmon                                          Lox and Cream Cheese.

Health Benefits of Salmon

BENEFITS RELATED TO OMEGA-3 CONTENT

The Standard American Diet (SAD) tragically lacks Omega-3 the good fatty acids, instead it contains Omega-6 the bad fats.  Systemic inflammation in the human body is the root of  almost all  known chronic health conditions, including everything from rheumatoid arthritis and high cholesterol to dementia and cancer. Omega-3 fats reduce inflammation and Omega-6 fats promote inflammation. Sources for Omega-6 fats come from hydrogenated vegetable oils. Salmon has earned its research reputation as a health-supportive food based largely on its unusual omega-3 fatty acid content. It has one of the best sources for omega-3 fatty acid. Yet has smoking salmon changed anything and cause any damage?

Smoked salmon is popular and in some cases it is considered a delicacy.  In Jewish cuisine smoked salmon is called lox and is usually eaten on a bagel with cream cheese. In North America, smoked salmon is often sliced very thinly and served on bread with cream cheese or with sliced red onion, lemon and capers. Slices of smoked salmon are a popular appetizer in Europe, usually served with some kind of bread. Smoked salmon is sometimes used in sushi, though not widely used in Japan it is used in North American sushi bars, for example in a “Philadelphia Roll”

The process of smoking salmon is either a hot or cold technique. Hot smoking takes place between 120 and 180 degrees for 6-12 hours depending on the size of the fish or flavor desired. Cold smoking takes place between 70 and 90 degrees for 1 day to 3 weeks.

The George Mateljan Foundation of The World’s Healthiest Foods book

This book is an invaluable resource to nutrition I make use of it often or more about this book

Smoke Salmon loses it Omega-3 fatty acids.

Freezing salmon has shown no ill effects but according to “Dr. Geroge”, Smoked salmon does not have the same nutrient value as fresh or frozen salmon.

Dr. George says “Salmon is one of the richest sources of omega-3 essential fatty acids. Smoking salmon has been found to substantially reduce its omega-3 content. For example, three ounces of baked Chinook salmon contain about two grams of omega-3 fatty acids. This same three-ounce portion of Chinook salmon, when smoked, contains less than one-half gram of omega-3s. This reduction in total omega-3 fatty acids is even greater when we look at one particularly important omega-3-EPA, or eicosapentaenoic acid. Smoked salmon contains about 20% as much EPA as non-smoked salmon on an ounce-for-ounce basis.”

Omega-3 the good fat vs. Omega-6 the bad fat

We need them both, but more Omega-3 in our diet then we need Omega-6.  The intake of Omega-6 fats should be limited. We need a good Omega-3 to Omega-6 ratio in our diet.

Omega-3is polyunsaturated essential fatty acidsSources  are apples,blueberries, dark colored grapes, eggs, fish oil, flax seed oil, grass feed beef (note not grain feed beef), greens, krill oil, leafy green vegetables, marine plankton, nuts, raspberries, seaweed (or sea vegetables), seeds, shellfish, and walnut oil.

Omega-6 – is also polyunsaturated essential fatty acids Omega-6 main sources are vegetable oils (plant oils) and animal foods – eggs, fish, grains, legumes, meat, nuts, and vegetable oil such as corn oil and soy oil that contain a high proportion of linoleic acid. Omega-6 fatty acids are abundant in the diet. The metabolic products of omega-6 are the direct opposite of omega-3 fats.

Omega-3 fatty acids are less abundant in the diet than Omega-6Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation, act as an antioxidant, reduce blood clotting, protect against different types of degenerative diseases, protect against aging, and reduce tumor growth.

What about canned salmon? 

According to The World’s Healthiest Foods bookCanned salmon offers some great advantages;

–         Most canned salmon is wild (Read Label)

–         It is available in the store year round

–         It is less expensive than fresh or frozen salmon

–         It is canned when fresh.  Salmon sold over the counter may not be fresh.

–         It is packed in its own oil which means greater quantities of omega-3s

–         Canned salmon also contains the bones which are soften by the canning process and safe to eat adding over half the calcium found in an 8-ounce glass of cow’s milk.

–         Canned salmon quite often also includes the soften skin which is safe to eat

Sources:

http://www.food.com/library/smoked-salmon-53?oc=linkback
The World’s Healthiest foods http://www.whfoods.com/

2 Comments
  1. Your Omega 3 & 6 chart is wrong, Series 1 and Series 2 eicosanoids are both produced on the omega-6 side of the pathway and are both essential and necessary for Optimum Health, and the body’s most powerful anti-inflammatory PGE1 Prostaglandin as a Series 1 eicosanoid is 10 times more powerful than the series 3 anti-inflammatories that come from the omega-3 side of the pathway.

    For the right chart see the chart from Mary Enig’s article here: http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/tripping-lightly-down-the-prostaglandin-pathways/

    The body prefers and will make and use eicosanoids from the omega-6 side of the pathway IF the omega-6 Linoleic Acid is available and supplied in the diet, but if not then the default backup mechanism is to use the omega-3 side of the pathway although the Series 3 Omega 3’s are not as powerful as the Series 1 and 2 eicosanoids from the omega-6 side of the pathway.

    The omega 6 and 3 pathway is very delicate and can be imbalanced by taking more of one omega than the other, or by taking them separately. Omega 6 & 3 must always be taken together and NEVER separately, and due to the fact that there is 11 times more omega-6 based tissue in the body than Omega-3 you should always take two to three times more omega-6 than omega-3 to maintain the optimum balance for Optimum Health. This is a very well-known fact that is discussed by Mary Enig, Ray Peat, Brian peskin, Edd and Patricia Kane and others as well.

    • Thank You for the update. Unfortunately your chart seems very confusing. I will update the article with your link but posting the actual picture I’m afraid will lead to confusion. My article is not meant to be the last word on the subject and there are many diagrams like this one for I didn’t create it. Again Thanks for your concern for accuracy and for reading my article
      Joan

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